Menu

Local

Pop ups popping up at Grosvenor Metro stop

xPop up Shops at Metro 1Pop-up shopping at Grovesnor Metro in Bethesda. PHOTO BY MARK POETKER Commuters at the Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro stop aren’t rushing to their cars at the end of the day quite as quickly as they normally do. Between now and the end of June, the area between the parking lot and the entrance to the Red Line train is home to pop-up stores selling food, clothing and flowers on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays between 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

What started as an idea to demonstrate to commuters how they plan to redevelop the station area in a few years, Fivesquares Development in Washington, D.C., took a retired 4,000-series Metro car and cut it up into numerous pieces, which currently serve as home to the popup stores, which opened May 17.

“We wanted to bring life to the plaza,” said Ron Kaplan, principal at Fivesquares.

Read more...

Matthews roasted for charity

Kathleen Matthews HeadshotKathleen Matthews.                         FILE PHOTO  NORTH BETHESDA – A little more than a year ago, former ABC 7 news anchor and Marriott executive Kathleen Matthews conceded the most expensive House of Representatives election in the County.

One year after winning the Democratic Primary and five months after being sworn into Congress, Rep. Jamie Raskin (D- 8) finally got his chance to rub in his victory over Matthews –albeit for charity.

“The returns came early from Frederick and Carroll counties where our friend David Trone was trouncing us both.” Raskin said. “And we were on the edges of our seats. I could not wait for the votes to come in from Silver Spring and Takoma Park, she could not wait for the votes to come in from Georgetown and Nantucket.”

On May 11, Matthews’ friends, family members and even political rivals roasted her to raise money for the Jubilee Foundation, a non-profit that helps care for people with developmental and intellectual disabilities.

Read more...

Sentinel claims awards

Sentinel Staff Photo 1bThe Sentinel Staff with owner Lynn Kapiloff, seated. PHOTO BY MARK POETKER   ANNAPOLIS - The Montgomery County Sentinel Newspapers was awarded the Maryland Delaware, District of Columbia Press Association “News Organization of the Year” award for the second time in as many years in a ceremony here Friday.

“It is an honor to be awarded this distinction for the second time in as many years and the third time in the last five years,” said Sentinel owner Lynn Kapiloff. “It is vital for independent publications to remain vibrant – especially at this time in our history.”

The Sentinel won 35 awards out of a possible 48 categories, picking up first and second place in categories such as Investigative Reporting, State Government Reporting, and Multimedia Storytelling (news).

Read more...

Rockville promotes diversity with flag display

Rockville Flags 21aFlags from countries around the world are being installed across Rockville. PHOTO BY MARK POETKER Diversity is what the City of Rockville wanted to portray when officials decided to hang flags of the world on its light poles, but initial reaction to the flags created a diversity of another sort.

When shoppers mulling around Rockville Town Square recently were asked what they thought of the international display, a few said they hadn’t even noticed, and others thought the flags were regularly put up each year for Memorial Day. Only a few connected it with cultural diversity.

The City of Rockville currently is installing a total of 193 flags – the number of sovereign states in the United Nations – to show its commitment to diversity and inclusion. More than 150 are already decorating Rockville.

Read more...

MoCo sees slight dip in number of homeless residents

Homelessness in Montgomery County decreased by 9 percent from 2016 to 2017, according to an annual survey conducted by Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.

According to the survey, which was a one-night snapshot of the homeless population on Jan. 25 of this year, there were 894 homeless people in the County, as compared to 981 in 2016 and 1,100 in 2015.

The 894 people included 86 families and 172 children, according to the survey.

The survey, in its 17th year, tallied the homeless population in nine jurisdictions in the Washington, D.C. area. Overall, there were 11,128 homeless individuals in the nine jurisdictions, according to the survey which was released last week.

Amanda Harris, Montgomery County’s chief of special needs housing in its Department of Health and Human Services, called the numbers in the survey “typical,” although the survey noted that day was unseasonably warm.

Read more...

Gaithersburg residents vow to continue suit

GAITHERSBURG – The plaintiff in a lawsuit against the Gaithersburg city government has pledged to modify and refile his suit after being dealt a legal setback last week.

Aaron Rosenzweig, a Gaithersburg resident who has testified several times before Mayor Jud Ashman and the City Council and founded the website teamgaithersburg.org with the goal of increasing civic involvement, filed suit on Feb. 1 against Gaithersburg with regard to a vote taken by the Council on Dec. 19. On that date, the council passed two resolutions authorizing the annexation of the Johnson Property, an area near the intersection of Darnestown Road and Quince Orchard Boulevard and authorizing City Manager Tony Tomasello to execute an agreement to develop the property for mixed-zone commercial and residential development. Because of the absence or recusal of most of the five-member council, Council Vice President Neil Harris and Council member Michael Sesma passed both resolutions with a 2-0 vote.

Read more...

Takoma Park votes and changes its election laws

Takoma Park Govt logoTAKOMA PARK— The City mayor and Council changed the voting rules in the city charter May 10, bringing a slew of changes to the election process.

“It passed, we just changed our elections…it was harder than giving birth,” said Mayor Kate Stewart.

With the adoption of the charter amendment, the date of City elections will change from odd-numbered years to even-numbered years, synchronizing it with State and County elections.

It will also change the date of the nominating meeting, the day which the mayor and Council take office, and will extend the time for certification of election results. The length of the 2017 term will change, too.

Read more...

Rosenstein of Bethesda in national news with his role in the FBI following Comey's sacking

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is not ignorant of controversy in Washington.

In 2006, Rosenstein was appointed U.S. Attorney for Maryland after then President George W. Bush fired seven U.S. Attorneys including Maryland’s Thomas M. DiBiagio.

Bethesda resident Rosenstein, the newly-appointed Deputy Attorney General for the U.S. Department of Justice, is now in the middle of one of the biggest stories in the country after President Donald J. Trump fired James Comey as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation last week.

Read more...

MoCo delegation satisfied with legislative session

Three members of Montgomery County delegation to the Maryland General Assembly say they are satisfied with their achievements of the 2017 legislative session.

"The 2017 session was quite productive in terms of getting some progressive legislation passed that had been stalled for years," said Del. David Moon (D-20) who represents Takoma Park.

"It was a really busy session, we got a lot done," said Del. Kirill Reznik (D-39) who represents Germantown and Montgomery Village. "From a progressive point of view, from a productive point of view, I think it was a very good session," he added.

The legislation which passed into law included paid sick leave, a fracking ban, and changes to the crime of rape.

Read more...

Aspen Hill Library plans to 'refresh' this Spring

xAspen Hill LibraryAspen Hill Library.                                                                PHOTO BY PETER ROULEAU  ASPEN HILL – The Aspen Hill Library closed to the public in November for a “refresh” project designed to update the building’s facilities, but patrons are growing frustrated at the slow progress and lack of a target reopening date six months later.

At the time of the closure, Montgomery County Public Libraries announced that the refresh would take five to six months and that it anticipated reopening the branch in spring.

Some patrons also resent the lack of communication from MCPL.

Chris Swan, president of the Aspen Hill chapter of Friends of the Library, and her husband, Elliot Chabot, chair of the Aspen Hill Library Advisory Committee, have long advocated for a more thorough refit of the library building and facilities.

“Here they’re going to be spending $800,000; on the one in Wheaton, they’re going to be spending $65 million on a completely new library,” Chabot said in October just before the closure. “In the time this library’s been standing, Wheaton’s will have been completely rebuilt twice, and yet we still have essentially what we had in 1967.”

Read more...