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State and local officials stress importance to “fight for Marylanders” at JCRC breakfast

  • Published in Local

JCRC logoA number of state and local representatives stressed the importance of speaking out against Congress’s proposed cuts to programs aimed at helping the state’s most vulnerable as well as standing up for the values Marylanders hold dear, during a Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Washington legislative breakfast Nov. 30.

“We need all hands on deck” to work against the Trump administration’s budget, said U.S. Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.)

“We are going to need engagement by everyone of you. We are going to need enormous amounts of selflessness,” said Chuck Short, special assistant to County Executive Ike Leggett.

A who’s who of Maryland legislators and candidates were among the 200 attendees at the second annual Schmooze and Nosh Maryland Legislative Breakfast at Congregation Har Shalom in Potomac. The event was sponsored by JCRC, which represents more than 100 synagogues and organizations in the D.C. area.

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County sets sights on ending homelessness

  • Published in Local

Montgomery County has set what it considers a very doable goal of providing housing for its 242 chronic homeless people and is committed to ending chronic homelessness within its borders by the end of this year.

In a community memorial service held outdoors in the Circuit Court Plaza on June 7, the new initiative called Inside, Not Outside, was announced.

County Administrative Officer Chuck Short explained that since the County’s homeless veterans have now been placed, it is time to focus on the chronically homeless, people who have been homeless for at least one year or have had at least four episodes of homelessness during the previous three years and have some problem or disability that needs a specific intervention, such as drug or alcohol addiction or illness.

Those who aren’t considered the chronic homeless have a specific, short-term, problem that forced them into the streets for a few months, including job loss or high medical bills.

Even if the County does provide housing — not just space in a shelter — there always will be new people ending up on the street or in a car, said Council member George Leventhal.

“We have to keep working on it every year,” he said. “People’s situations change all the time.”

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