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Two wastewater overflows occur on WSSC property

  • Published in State

Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission officials said tens of thousands of gallons of wastewater spilled each in two separate instances near an Upper Marlboro wastewater treatment plant Saturday.

WSSC crews placed warning signs at the sites of two separate overflows that occurred near the Western Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant in Upper Marlboro Saturday.

“We posted signs at both sites, and we cleaned the affected area (s),” WSSC spokesperson Ayoka Blandford said.

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Electric cars grabbing larger share of market

  • Published in Local

Electric cars are coming and coming quickly.

A conference on electric cars and charging stations took place at the Hilton Garden Inn in Rockville April 13.

There are three basic kinds of electrically-powered vehicles. First, there are standard hybrids such as the Prius and its many competitors, which take gasoline and have no plug-in apparatus.

Second are plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (“PHEVs”). They take gasoline and also have plug-in capability. There already are 20 PHEV brand/models in the marketplace.

Third are all-electric EVs. They have plug-in capability only. Both the Bolt and the Leaf, the best-selling model nationally in this category, are EVs, as are Teslas. There are about 15 brand/models of EVs.

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All we are is dust in the wind

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When the Courts are called upon to review decisions of administrative agencies on technical issues such as air pollution levels, they have to balance deferring to the expertise of the agency with the judicial obligation to interpret statutes and regulations. This can make it hard at times to reach judicial consensus, as illustrated by the 4-3 decision in a case from Maryland’s Court of Appeals this month called Kor-ko, Ltd. v. Maryland Department of the Environment.

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Urban runoff affects water quality and threatens wildlife

  • Published in Local

ROCKVILLE – Urban runoff is a major problem that affects water quality across Montgomery and Prince George's County.

Impervious surfaces cause sediment, bacteria, and pesticides to wash into the natural and urban water systems.

What constitutes urban runoff ranges from natural ambient soils to concrete, rubber crumbs, and metal chips; all of which come from a variety of urban and man-made sources.

The impact varies greatly and depending on the quantity, the effects can be ecologically destructive and affect regional water quality.

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