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Mitsubishi crossover, big Toyota sedan retain some appeal

2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport cropped for webThe 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport doesn't impress for its refinement or fuel efficiency, but it delivers a true crossover experience in a small and affordable package. COURTESY PHOTO  Mitsubishi was ahead of the curve when it launched the 2011 Outlander Sport. A size smaller than a Honda CR-V or Toyota RAV4, the Outlander Sport offered the high seating position, available all-wheel-drive and useful cargo capacity of competing compact crossovers – just without as much bulk or as high of a price.
Now, an entire market class has joined Mitsubishi: the subcompact crossover. It faces off against such competitors as the Honda HR-V and Toyota C-HR, after those automakers also realized that not everyone wanted a crossover as large as their best-selling models.
The Outlander Sport has changed little since 2011, but it retains its fundamental appeal. From its base price of $21,360, the 2018 Outlander Sport provides a credible crossover experience in a class where some models offer no more cargo space or ground clearance than an economy car. Mitsubishi also boosts its value quotient by including such items as a touchscreen infotainment system, 18-inch alloy wheels and automatic climate control as no-extra-cost standard equipment, along with generous warranty coverage.
That's not to say that it's all good news. Even back in 2011, the Outlander Sport wasn't too impressive for its refinement or driving dynamics – and without major mechanical upgrades since then, it's not surprising that the 2018 also isn't going to blow you away.

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Mitsubishi crossover seats seven while Genesis rolls

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander cropped for webThe 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander isn't perfect, but it's an affordable, fuel-efficient, maneuverable crossover with three rows of seats. COURTESY PHOTO  It was more than a decade ago when Mitsubishi first squeezed a third-row seat into the Outlander, its compact crossover. But rather than giving the Outlander an edge over the competition, it made the car look almost like a cruel joke. There were seven seat belts, sure, but the third row was basically fabric stretched across a metal frame. Padding was nonexistent and legroom wasn't much better; almost no one had enough space to fit in the far back of the 2006 Outlander, and no one at all could be comfortable.

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Reviews of the 2017 Mitsubishi Mirage and Volvo S90

Small Mitsubishi offers modern basics at affordable price

2017 Mitsubishi Mirage G4 SEThe 2017 Mitsubishi Mirage G4 SE is far from invigorating to drive, but it meets modern standards for safety and feature content at a particularly low price point. COURTESY PHOTO  

It's hard to find a truly basic car these days. Every vehicle on the market meets high standards for safety, including crash-test performance that would have been outstanding just a decade ago, and standard electronic stability control. Nearly every vehicle on the market is equipped with electronic features that include USB connectivity and power windows, locks and mirrors.

The Mitsubishi Mirage is the least expensive vehicle sold in the U.S. with those features. Available as a five-door hatchback or a newly introduced four-door sedan, the Mirage hatchback starts at a sticker price of just $13,830 (or $1,000 more for the tested G4 sedan). Even the well-equipped G4 SE – the tested car with an automatic transmission, alloy wheels, automatic climate control, heated front seats, cruise control, a proximity key system with push-button start, Bluetooth connectivity, a backup camera, and a touchscreen infotainment system with Android Auto or Apple CarPlay integration – is just $17,830.

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Reviews of the 2016 Mitsubishi i-MiEV and Ford Focus

Electric car i-MiEV is rudimentary but affordable

2016 Mitsubishi i-MiEV2016 Mitsubishi i-MiEV    COURTESY PHOTO  

The stereotypical electric vehicle is a slow, silly-looking excuse for an automobile that can't go very far before running out of charge. Most of today's EVs avoid this image. The best-selling model is the fast, luxurious Tesla Model S, which goes several hundreds of miles at a time; most other models are simply normal cars that are fitted with a battery instead of an engine.

Then there is the 2016 Mitsubishi i-MiEV, which at first glance looks like a walking advertisement for the internal combustion engine. It's a tiny car that isn't very quick and is only rated to travel 62 miles per charge, by far the worst of any all-electric car on sale today. Its interior appointments are basic and the exterior is almost comical.

But if you're at all interested in the idea of a gas-free runabout, you may want to look further into the egg-shaped i-MiEV (pronounced EYE-meev). As long as you wouldn't need to drive long distances in this car, low operating costs and numerous state and federal incentives give it some appeal.

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