Menu

NIH study finds possible red-meat allergy

  • Published in Local

nihlogoRed meat could be the source of a newly-discovered allergen, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health. 

“This novel finding from a small group of subjects from Virginia raises the intriguing possibility that allergy to red meat may be an under-recognized factor in heart disease,” said Dr. Coleen McNamara, one of the authors of the study and a professor of medicine in the Cardiovascular Research Center of the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville.

Read more...

NIH study finds gaps in concussion care

  • Published in Health

nihlogoThe National Institutes of Health reveals gaps in the treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injuries, according to a recently published study.

“A lot of people get traumatic brain injury but it’s such a complex disease that the care of [it] isn’t well known,” said Patrick Bellgowan, Ph.D., Program Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. “We also don’t know who's going to recover and how well they’re going to recover.”

Read more...

NIH reports cancer rates dropping

  • Published in Health

NIH LogoCancer rates across the United States are declining, according to a new report from the National Institutes of Health.

Known as the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, the report examined data across 42 states --concluding that diagnosis and death data decreased from 1999-2015.

“This year’s report is an encouraging indicator of progress we’re making in cancer research. As overall death rates continue to decline for all major racial and ethnic groups in the United States, it’s clear that interventions are having an impact,” said National Cancer Institute Director Ned Sharpless, M.D. “The report also highlights areas where more work is needed. With steadfast commitment to patients and their families, we will be able to lower the mortality rates faster and improve the lives of those affected by cancer.”

“The key point is that mortality from cancer is going down for both men and women … and children as well,” said Kathleen Cronin, Ph.D., one of the authors of the report and a researcher at NCI.

Read more...

Cyberbullying leads to youth depression

  • Published in Health

nihlogoA new study from the National Institutes of Health shows that cyberbullying, dissatisfaction in family relationships, and unmet medical needs contribute to higher rates of depressive symptoms among LGBT youth across the United States.

“The study shows that adolescence is a critical window for interventions to address depressive symptoms experienced by sexual minority youth,” said Jeremy Luk, Ph.D., first author of the study and postdoctoral researcher at NIH’s National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. “Without appropriate screening and intervention, these disparities may likely persist into young adulthood.”

Read more...

Marching for Science to deny the deniers

  • Published in News

IMG 3359Protesters descend on Washington, D.C. in support of science PHOTO BY ABBY CRUZWASHINGTON, D.C. — Virginia resident Michael Griffith has always loved rocks. 

“I’ve been a rock hound ever since I was a little kid,” said Griffith. 

Although Griffith, age 56, never completed his geology degree, he continues to value the science. He said that enduring interest brought him to the March for Science on Saturday. 

“It is an uphill climb to convince the powers that be that this is important,” Griffith said.

He attended the March in 2017, during which he said it was pouring rain.

Read more...

Alcohol-related visits to ERs are on the rise

  • Published in Health

emergency roomAmericans are making more visits to hospital emergency rooms with alcohol-related causes, a new study released by the National Institutes of Health found.

“In just nine years, the number of people transported to the [emergency room] annually for medical emergencies caused or exacerbated by alcohol increased from about 3 million to 5 million,” said George F. Koob, Ph.D., Director of NIH’s National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. “These findings are indicative of the detrimental effects that acute and chronic alcohol misuse have on public health, and the significant burden they place on our healthcare system.”

Read more...

NIH study shows air pollution increases pregnancy risks

  • Published in Health

NIH Logo

A new study released by the National Institutes of Health reveals that effects from air pollution could increase the risk of early pregnancy loss.

"We've studied air pollution and reproductive health for several years, it's an area of research for myself and my team," said Pauline Mendola, Ph.D., the lead author of the study and a researcher at NIH's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Mendola explained that after she and her colleagues published a paper earlier this year that revealed that exposure to ground-level ozone was associated with stillbirth, they were curious to see whether the same pollutants could be correlated with miscarriage as well. The study concluded that couples exposed to air pollution were more likely to experience a loss in early-stage pregnancies.

Read more...

NIH launches project to crowdsource pregnancy health information

  • Published in Health

The National Institutes of Health has launched a project to improve the understanding of pregnancy through crowdsourcing information gathered through surveys.

Known as PregSource, the project presents data collected through surveys as an informational resource for doctors, researchers, and women experiencing pregnancy.

“PregSource benefits everyone – the participants, their healthcare providers, and the research community," said Dr. Diana W. Bianchi, director of NIH’s National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, which leads the project. “The project also will generate much-needed data to help researchers address long-held questions about maternal and fetal health.”

Read more...

NIH discovers drainage system in brain

  • Published in Health

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have confirmed the existence of a drainage system in the human brain.

“We literally watched people’s brains drain fluid into these vessels,” said Dr. Daniel S. Reich a researcher at the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the senior author of the study. “We hope that our results provide new insights to a variety of neurological disorders.”

Reich explained that his research team discovered the brain had vessels that are part of the body’s lymphatic system. The lymphatic system is designed to drain waste and fight infections by distributing white blood cells to various parts of the body.

Read more...

Drinking diet soda no safer than regular soda during pregnancy

  • Published in News

Tumbler of cola with iceConsuming diet soda during pregnancy can increase a child's risk of obesity, according to a study from the National Institutes of Health.

"Our findings suggest that artificially-sweetened beverages during pregnancy are not likely to be any better at reducing the risk for later childhood obesity than sugar-sweetened beverages," said Chilin Zhang, an epidemiologist at NIH's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed