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Mueller questions

download 2As the suspense mounts regarding whether the leader of the free world will submit to questioning by Special Counsel Robert Mueller on the so-called “Russia investigation” and the existence of any “COLLUSION,” I thought it might be helpful to provide our president with some suggested answers to just a few of the 49 questions compiled by Trump's attorney, Jay Sekulow. As reported in the New York Times a few weeks back, these 49 questions were crafted by Sekulow from discussions with the Mueller team.
The questions can be broken down into a few categories. These categories include questions related to the actions of and interaction with former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, questions regarding conversations with former F.B.I. Director James Comey, questions pertaining to interaction with and decisions made by Attorney General Jefferson Sessions, and last, but certainly not least, questions dealing with any coordination by Trump or any members of his campaign (notice I did not use the word “COLLUSION”) with Rusha – I mean Russia).
So, here goes:

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Raskin, Hoyer, warn of potential future election interference

  • Published in Local

ROCKVILLE — As the 2018 primary election approaches, foreign election interference could be at play, Congressman Jamie Raskin warned.

“It’s been nearly two years since Russia’s sweeping and unprecedented assault on the country’s elections in 2016,” Raskin said to an audience of about 70 people at Richard Montgomery High School on Tuesday evening. “Although there’s no evidence that vote counts were altered … actors were able to gain access to and could have deleted voter registration records or altered poll books.”

Raskin (MD-8), who was joined by Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer (MD-5), Election Assistance Commission Chairman Tom Hicks, Center for American Progress Voting Rights Manager Danielle Root, and Brennan Center for Justice’s Democracy Program Liz Howard, warned that, much as in 2016, the 2018 midterm elections could be targeted by foreign adversaries such as Russia.

Hoyer explained that the issues have previously plagued elections in the United States, including in 2000, when butterfly ballots resulted in the "hanging chads," causing confusion about votes cast in Florida. He added that election machine manufacturers need to be held to “high standard of security.”

“I think we’re moving in a very positive direction resulting from a negative event,” Hoyer added.

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It's all about Russia -stupid

trumpnmeSarah Huckabee Sanders walked out to the podium twice this week and once again spread a false narrative about former FBI Director James Comey. She accused him of illegally leaking information to the public when she and everyone in the present administration have absolutely no proof of it – and in fact have absolute proof that when Comey leaked memos he wasn’t leaking classified information and therefore he didn’t do anything illegal.
It doesn’t matter. The President’s base will buy it. They’ll believe it. They’ll endorse it. They will repeat it. They will cheer it and they will yell “Fake News” at anyone who says otherwise.

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The lost Sessions in Congress

Sessions hearingGive me a break! I really don't mind attending these Congressional hearings on the Russia probe.
I actually find them quite interesting and, at times, informative and even entertaining. Sometimes, however, the stench they generate can be quite overwhelming. Case in point: the June 13th Senate Intelligence Committee hearing and the testimony of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

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Dreaming the impeachable dream

Don Quixote tilting at windmillsIn 1868 the House of Representatives resolved to adopt articles of impeachment against President Andrew Johnson because, it was contended, the president violated the Tenure of Office Act. This Act required Senate approval for removing certain office holders.
It was the contention of the House that the president violated this Act when he removed Edwin McMasters Stanton, the Secretary of War, from office and replaced him with Lorenzo Thomas.
The Tenure of Office Act, by the way, was only in effect from 1667 to 1887.
Did this violation by President Johnson truly warrant impeachment or was adopting articles of impeachment purely a political act by Congress? Your guess is as good as mime regarding this impeachment hearing, but of note President Johnson was not convicted by the Senate.

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