Menu

Sentinel claims awards

  • Published in Local

Sentinel Staff Photo 1bThe Sentinel Staff with owner Lynn Kapiloff, seated. PHOTO BY MARK POETKER   ANNAPOLIS - The Montgomery County Sentinel Newspapers was awarded the Maryland Delaware, District of Columbia Press Association “News Organization of the Year” award for the second time in as many years in a ceremony here Friday.

“It is an honor to be awarded this distinction for the second time in as many years and the third time in the last five years,” said Sentinel owner Lynn Kapiloff. “It is vital for independent publications to remain vibrant – especially at this time in our history.”

The Sentinel won 35 awards out of a possible 48 categories, picking up first and second place in categories such as Investigative Reporting, State Government Reporting, and Multimedia Storytelling (news).

Read more...

Letters to the Editor, October 27, 2016

 

Republican voting for Clinton

 

To the editor;
I am among those Republicans who have re-registered as Unaffiliated.
I was a life-long Republican. I have never voted for a Democrat since first voting in 1972.. This year I will be voting for the Democratic candidates for President, the US Senate, and the US House of Representatives. The Republican nominee for President does not represent conservative, Republican values and is unfit to be President. Yet he has not been repudiated by either the national Republican party nor by most Republican candidates.

Read more...

Unknown chemicals may pose water supply risk

  • Published in Local

As it turns out, the old adage may be right – what you don’t know can harm you.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates 83 contaminants as part of its primary standard on drinking water.

These contaminants include lead, trihalomethanes, asbestos, bacteria and viruses, which if above a certain level, are a risk to human health.

But the EPA also has another list of 30 contaminants that agency monitors but does not regulate.

For many of these contaminants the science is unclear whether they are a health risk to people, while others clearly pose a risk to people.

“The only concern is something we don’t already know, that just started coming up in the newspaper and we don’t know how to test for it or something some people may say it’s bad, but we don’t know whether it’s really bad,” said Jin Shin a water quality manager at the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC), the primary water utility for people in Montgomery and Prince George's Counties.

Read more...

"Safe To Drink"

  • Published in Local

"Water Supply Challenges" Part Five of Five: Well water in area has issues but tests confirm few dangerous contaminants

Faucet Running Water

Hard water is enough of an issue for area homes that receive their drinking water from wells that even the Poolesville town manager has a water softener installed at his home.

Water tests conducted by National Testing Laboratories for The Sentinel Newspapers showed the level of hardness at one sample site in Poolesville reached 210 milligrams per liter, 21 times the minimum detection level and twice the guideline set by the Water Quality Association and used by National Testing Laboratories.

Water hardness is not enforced by the Environmental Protection Agency like lead or other dangerous contaminants.

So while the water in Poolesville is still safe to drink, National Testing Laboratories director of business development Marianne Metzger said homeowners with hard water may want to consider treating it in order to prolong the life of their washing machines and sinks.

“It’s absolutely safe to drink. It’s totally an aesthetic issue,” said Metzger. “Knowing that you have hard water, you know it’s going to be harder on your appliances… It’s a choice that people have to make.”

Read more...

Letters to the Editor, October 20, 2016

 

 

Casting his vote for Van Hollen

To the editor;
In what has been a heated and often shocking election season, one thing remains true: we need to elect leaders who get things done. We need to elect people who not only fight for our values, but are willing to compromise when it is in the best interest of Maryland, as well. Chris Van Hollen is the pragmatic leader we need. At the end of the day, he gets it done.
For years, Republicans have tried to stop any and all efforts at progress or compromise. They orchestrated the government shutdown, and even now refuse to grant President Obama’s nominee to the Supreme Court a hearing, to say nothing about their flagrant refusal to fill the vacancy. In the face of it all, Chris Van Hollen has continued to reach across the aisle to be an effective legislator in Washington.

Read more...

"Disaster Waiting To Happen"

  • Published in Local

"Water Supply Challenges" Part Four of Five: Water infrastructure challenged by lack of spending and low utility rates

Faucet Running Water

More than 1,800 water mains throughout the Washington Suburban Sanitation Commission system are breaking annually, according to WSSC spokesperson Jerry Irvine.

Meanwhile, a six-month investigation by The Sentinel Newspapers revealed a number of containments in city water, well water and surface water at 50 sites throughout Montgomery County and Prince George’s counties.

Read more...

Letters to the Editor, October 13, 2016

Robots and the school year?

To the editor;

“OK, robot waitress.  Your first recommendation was the slow baked salmon with lemon and thyme.    I’ll try that.  With the peas and carrots.  By the way, that is a snazzy outfit you’re wearing…. You’re welcome. ”  

In a few years conversations like this will become common.   More broadly, robots will increasingly perform many jobs now performed by humans.   We may expect that the robots generally will first be used to do repetitive physical jobs.   Jobs remaining available to humans will involve greater complexity and skill.  Less skilled humans will have a harder time finding work.   New kinds of human jobs will be created more slowly than traditional jobs disappear.

Read more...

“Something we battle”

  • Published in Local

"Water Supply Challenges" Part Three of Five: Local streams, lakes and rivers contain dangerous levels of contaminants

Faucet Running Water

ROCKVILLE – Though government officials warn people about the dangers of drinking untreated water, an investigation by The Sentinel Newspapers shows just how toxic the water is in local lakes, ponds, rivers and streams.

Scientists say contaminants in the surface water include possible cancer-causing agents, which ultimately affect the quality of the water in the Chesapeake Bay.

A series of independent tests conducted by National Testing Laboratories for The Sentinel Newspaper found as many as 18 contaminants in a body of water.

Read more...

Water quality may have adverse effect on your pets

  • Published in Local

SEABROOK – County residents may want to think twice before giving Fido a bowl of water or filling Swimmy’s tank in Prince George’s County.

Over the past few months The Sentinel Newspapers has conducted a series of water tests throughout the county. The tests samples were pulled from city water, provided through the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC), while local rivers and lakes and were analyzed by National Testing Laboratories Ltd. in Ypsilanti, Mich.

While the water sampling did not yield any serious red flags in water quality, as most contaminates fell below Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, The Sentinel found numerous traces of metals, moderate to high levels of chlorine and variances in water hardness.

Read more...

"It's Not Sexy"

  • Published in Local

"Water Supply Challenges" Part Two of Five: Firefighters and consumers in Rockville face water pipe problems

IMG 0280

ROCKVILLE – For at least the last decade, corroded water pipes in the city have restricted water flow to fire hydrants across the city, limiting the amount of city water firefighters can use to fight fires.

In a dozen sites across the city, water pressure at those hydrants is less than half of the national guidelines city officials follow as their standards.

Since 2009, Rockville has replaced most of its low-flowing water fire hydrants, but there are still a dozen remaining in the city potentially hampering firefighters’ ability to put out fires.

Rockville Mayor Bridget Donnell Newton said the 12 remaining low-flowing hydrants create “potential problems” in public safety.

 “With infrastructure, it’s not sexy to replace pipes. People don’t see it like new parks or buildings,” said Newton.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed