Menu

Gburg’s Spiegel calls for highway funds restoration

  • Published in Local

gaithersburg buildingGAITHERSBURG — At Monday night’s meeting of Gaithersburg’s Mayor and City Council, Council Vice President Ryan Spiegel identified what he called the top priority for Gaithersburg and all other Maryland municipalities in the current legislative session. Spiegel, who also serves as statewide chair of the legislative committee of the Maryland Municipal League, noted that under a formula set by state law, cities and towns throughout Maryland are entitled to receive funding for roadway restoration and maintenance,

“Unfortunately, that formula was eviscerated by the State of Maryland back in 2009 during the Great Recession,” Spiegel said. “Ever since them, cities and towns have been working to get the state to restore that formula to its rightful equation, because without it, cities and towns are being deprived of the money they need to maintain our roads and other transportation infrastructure.”

Spiegel said that the MML sought public involvement in helping to convince state legislators to restore this funding, known as highway user revenues, or HURs, which is largely funded by state gasoline taxes.

Read more...

Rockville replacing road paving

  • Published in Local

Rockville paversRoad crews in Rockville work on repaving the downtown area with brick pavers. PHOTO BY MIKE CLARKFoot traffic from so many festivals, difficulties for drivers seeing lane markings and a desire to keep walkways as nice as the one in front of a nearby hotel are all part of the reason the City of Rockville is spending almost $1 million to replace some of its road paving around the Town Center area. 

“The lane markings didn’t do that well,” said City of Rockville Chief of Construction Management Mike Wilhelm.

Read more...

Takoma Park approves junction traffic study

  • Published in Local

TAKOMA PARK — The Takoma Park City Council on Wednesday approved a traffic study which will further advance the Takoma Junction redevelopment process.

“The city’s study is to identify options to address safety concerns and mitigate traffic congestion at Takoma Junction and evaluate the extent of cut-through traffic in adjacent neighborhoods,” City Manager Suzanne Ludlow said during the Council’s Wednesday evening meeting. “The findings will be used to advocate for roadway and intersection improvements.”

Read more...

Rice says debt, school capacity problems and Purple Line influencing County CIP

  • Published in Local

GAITHERSBURG – County residents say they are concerned about capital budget projects, such as the aging Poolesville High School never being refreshed and the security of temporary classrooms near elementary schools.

On Monday, County Council Education Committee chairperson Craig Rice (District 2) told residents that the Purple Line – the light-rail service to connect Montgomery and Prince George’s counties—as well as the Council’s new spending affordability guidelines and County debt are chipping away at the money County will permit to be spent on school building costs and capital projects for schools in the FY 2019-2024 Capital Improvements Plan.

Read more...

Former Sentinel reporter makes history

  • Published in Local

With election win, Danica Roem becomes first openly transgender legislator to serve anywhere in the U.S.

Danica Roem photoDanica Roem after winning three MDDC awards for the Sentinel.                                        FILE PHOTO  The experience and knowledge Virginia Delegate-Elect (and former Montgomery County Sentinel News Editor) Danica Roem (D) gained while covering local politics in Montgomery County proved invaluable to her winning effort in Tuesday’s election, Roem told the Sentinel during an interview the morning after her historic victory, which will make her the first openly transgender individual to serve in Virginia’s House of Delegates.

“When I was news editor of the Montgomery County Sentinel, I was part of a team that did a five-part series on water infrastructure, and I talked a lot about that series,” Roem said. “I talked about water infrastructure a lot on this campaign.”

Such issues might be boring – “the kind of stuff that makes reporters zone out” – but are extremely important, she said. “You’ve gotta take care of your infrastructure.”

Read more...

Chevy Chase Council caught in the middle

  • Published in Local

Tension was noticeably thick as over a dozen residents of the Town of Chevy Chase spoke to the Town Council about their displeasure with the tactics and trustworthiness of Purple Line Transit Partners during a meeting at the Jane E. Lawton Community Center last Monday night.

“I would like the Council to formally put on record a request to fire the Purple Line Transit Partners, the private contractor behind the ridiculously short notice people had that the trail was going to be closed four to five years” said Deborah Vollmer during the public comments portion of the agenda. “They are thuggish; they’re incompetent.  And the way they have entered into this project we can only ask what more outrages are we going to face? What more corners are they going to cut?”

On Aug. 29, the Maryland Transit Administration announced on its Purple Line website that it would close the approximately 3.5-mile trail to begin construction on the rail system. The light-rail line will travel between Silver Spring and Bethesda on the trail right-of-way.

Read more...

Hogan offers expansion plans and toll roads to ease traffic congestion in Capital corridor

  • Published in News

GAITHERSBURG – Gov. Larry Hogan announced three separate projects totaling $9 billion to widen Interstate Highway 270, Interstate Highway 495 and State Route 295 Sept. 21.

Hogan, along with Maryland Secretary of Transportation Pete Rahn, announced officials in his administration began the process of soliciting potential companies with which to form a public-private partnership (P3) to add four toll lanes each to Interstate Highway 270, to Interstate Highway 495 and to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway.

“The daily backups on the Capital Beltway, I-270 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway have made the Baltimore-Washington corridor one of the most congested regions in the nation,” Hogan said. “This problem has been marring the quality of life of Maryland citizens for decades. Today we are finally going to do something about it.”

Read more...

Delaney tries to tackle crumbling infrastructure

 

220px John Delaney 113th Congress official photoWhen it comes to corporate tax breaks one ordinarily thinks Republican and one would ordinarily be correct in doing so.
However, what if the corporate tax break was not part of the usual “trickle-down economics” substanceless rhetoric but was actually applied directly to a specific undertaking that clearly benefited a particular community or communities?
That brings us to Democrat Congressman John Delaney of Maryland's 6th Congressional District.

Read more...

Metro finally finishes SafeTrack on Red Line

  • Published in Local

metro logoROCKVILLE – The project manager of SafeTrack, Metro’s year-long program of repairing the aging rail system, said the program has fixed the worst parts of the system but Metro has more work to do.

Laura Mason, SafeTrack project manager, used a comparison from Board Chairman D.C. Council member Jack Evans and described the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to a sick patient.

“I think we’ve stabilized the system, so I think how our chairman of the board (Evans) has put it is, the patient was very, very sick,” Mason said at Rockville Station June 21. “We’ve done surgery – we’ve repaired sections, we still have a long ways to go. We still need to do physical therapy, we need to eat well, and maintain our health, so we’ve taken care of the worst sixteen areas.”

Read more...

Federal infrastructure and us

White House Front TwilightCongressman John Sarbanes, Senator Chris Van Hollen and a host of other federal elected officials say they have a bone to pick with President Donald Trump.
Van Hollen, along with Republican Senator Lindsey Graham (talk about your strange bedfellows) are among those urging the Trump administration not to return two diplomatic compounds in the U.S. to Russian control. Intelligence reports indicate the two compounds – one in Maryland and one in New York – were used by the Russian government for intelligence-related purposes.
“The properties were seized because 17 U.S. intelligence agencies confirmed that Russia used covert cyberattacks, espionage and harmful propaganda to try and undermine our democracy,” Van Hollen and Graham said in a letter to the president.
The senators say returning the compounds to the Russians is unjustifiable.
“It would both make it easier for the Kremlin to continue its intelligence operations in our own backyard and make it clear that they can avoid consequences for their actions,” the senators said in the letter.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed