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Artist and children’s book author chosen to participate in outdoor arts festival

Raya Salman, one of the juried artists at Rockville’s A-RTS festival, poses in front of her booth. COURTESY PHOTORaya Salman, one of the juried artists at Rockville’s A-RTS festival, poses in front of her booth. COURTESY PHOTO  For a time, despite her devotion to it and training at the prestigious Sorbonne University in Paris, Raya Salman “couldn’t afford to live on art.”

Still, Salman, who was born in Lebanon and later relocated to England with her three children before landing in Montgomery County in 1991 and remarrying, wasn’t ready to give up on a professional art career.

Now that her children are 35, 32, and 28 – she also has two grandchildren – she is making up for lost time.

“I paint religiously two times a week,” she said. “One day a week I devote to marketing and social media.”

Her efforts have been recognized. Salman is one of seven Montgomery County artists selected by a jury to participate in A-RTS, a free annual outdoor arts festival at Rockville Town Square, which took place earlier this month on May 5 and 6.

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Bethesda festival draws artists from all over country

  • Published in Local

IMG 1686Jazz Artist by Kimmy Cantrell PHOTO BY NICKOLAI SUKHAREVBETHESDA — Hundreds of artists from around the country gathered over the weekend at the annual Bethesda Fine Arts Festival.

Organized by the Bethesda Urban Partnership and the Bethesda Arts and Entertainment District, the festival featured painters, photographers, and sculptors from numerous states across the country, who presented selections from their work in the Woodmont Triangle area of downtown Bethesda. Many artists also took the opportunity to sell pieces they had on display.

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Landscape painter finds outdoor inspiration, but executes canvases indoors

Baie St. Paul Creek by Leni BerlinerPHOTO OF “BAIE ST. PAUL CREEK by Leni BerlinerLocal artist Leni Berliner did some painting as a high school student many years ago, and like most student artists, she laid down her brushes after graduation.  But with the new millennium came what she called "a very difficult time" in her personal and professional life, the burden of which her mother sought to alleviate with a gift.

“My mother gave me the gift of drawing and painting classes at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in D.C.," Berliner said.

The classes reawakened a passion for painting and led her to rediscover and cultivate that talent.

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Exhibit pays tribute to laborers with extraordinary art

Woman Cleaning Shower“Woman Cleaning Shower” by Ramiro Gomez from National Portrait Gallery exhibit on work. COURTESY PHOTO  “The Sweat of their Face: Portraying American Workers,” an exhibit on view at the National Portrait Gallery, contains well-known, even iconic, images.

These include “Power House Mechanic,” a black-and-white photograph by Lewis Hine; “The Miner,” an oil painting by Pat Lyon; “American Gothic,” by Gordon Parks, oil on beaver wood; “Mine America’s Coal,” by Norman Rockwell, “Cotton Pickers,” oil, by Winslow Homer, and “Migrant Mother,” a print by Dorothea Lange.

Other images are less known and even surprising, such as daguerreotypes by Joseph T. Zealy of semi-dressed slaves. Richard Avedon, best known for his work with celebrities and fashion icons, portrays migrant workers in a series of photographs.

But co-curators Dorothy Moss and David C. Ward are hoping that regardless of the individual images, viewers understand the exhibit’s goal.

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“America’s Presidents” exhibit reopens at National Portrait Gallery

NPG George Washington PortraitA George Washington portrait is among the many works of art on display in the "America's Presidents" exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery. COURTESY PHOTO  The “America’s Presidents” exhibition at Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery is more than about portraits.

There’s historical context. The Gallery has grouped the portraits into six historical chapters, each with its own explanatory text. Five of these revolve around a particular era, each with one U.S. President anchoring it – George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

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BlackRock features political and social art of local artists

blackrockOne of the artworks presented at BlackRock. PHOTO BY REECE LINDENMAYER  

GERMANTOWN — The BlackRock Center for the Arts opened their first day of the year with an art exhibit featuring the work of three local artists.

In the Kay Gallery, the work of Linda Colsh and Julia Dzikiewicz is on display. Colsh’s work, entitled “Seeing the Unseen” focuses on elderly subjects, whom she believes are marginalized in society.

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Center Stage: Getting on the “Hot Beat” at Smithsonian American Art

WASHINGTON — An exhibit of Gene Davis’ work “Hot Beat” is currently running at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. At “Hot Beat,” visitors can view Davis’ signature art, which is defined by his unprecedented use of multi-colored, rhythmic stripes.

The title of Davis’ exhibit is also the namesake of one of his artworks. “Hot Beat”, like many of his other paintings, has a repeating motif of one color surrounded by colors that pop out and play with the notions of the viewer.

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Center Stage: Stuart Davis leaves lasting artistic impressions

stuart davisAn example of artwork created by modernist painter Stuart Davis, from the "Stuart Davis: In Full Swing" exhibit at the National Gallery of Art. COURTESY PHOTO  

WASHINGTON – An exhibit of the early 20th century American modernist painter Stuart Davis just opened to the public at the National Gallery of Art.

Entitled “In Full Swing”, this exhibit is a comprehensive examination of Davis’ career, including 5 rooms of his artwork and a short documentary created by the museum.

Davis, as described in the background summary adorning the entrance, was born to artists in New Jersey and dropped out of high school to study painting in Manhattan under Robert Henri.

Henri, among other things, encouraged his students to “find their own voices.”

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Center Stage: An exhibition of Romaine Brooks' revolutionary style

brooks ida rubinsteinRomaine Brooks' Ida Rubinstein.  PHOTO BY MARK POETKER  

WASHINGTON DC — The Smithsonian American Art Museum is holding an exhibition of Romaine Brooks, an early 20th century painter notable for her revolutionary depiction of women.

Unlike traditional paintings that depict female subjects with bright, flowery colors, Brooks’ paintings are characterized by her use of muted tones and portrayal of women in androgynous attire.

Brooks’ later works are notable for the bold outlines of her subjects mixed with lightly blended colors, giving her paintings a uniquely modern feel.

These techniques emphasize the assertive poses taken by many women in her paintings, allowing her subjects’ features to carry a distinct vibrancy that carries throughout her later works.

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Local artist sees Metro riders as zombies

Eric Gordon Zombie 1Eric Gordon with one of his paintings. PHOTO BY MARK POETKER  

TAKOMA PARK – Local artist Eric Gordon said he sees a semblance of zombies, or what he likes to call “creeps,” in riders of the D.C. Metro and he sketches them when he uses public transit.

Gordon said he couldn’t take full credit for the idea of depicting riders as akin to zombies or creeps.

“I think that’s not my theory. It’s the morning, nine to five, daily grind, people going to their daily jobs,” said Gordon. “A lot of times people would much rather go to the beach or have a cup of tea, stay at home, do something like that.”

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