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Sometimes you just want to go fast - or fast with some poise

The 2018 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 is a mild-looking compact luxury sedan with a whopping 400-horsepower V6 engine. COURTESY PHOTOThe 2018 Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 is a mild-looking compact luxury sedan with a whopping 400-horsepower V6 engine. COURTESY PHOTOSometimes, maybe you just want to go fast.
And luxury automakers are happy to help you do so — for the right price. As long as you’re willing to spend $60,000 to $70,000 (or more, if you pick any options), you can get more than 400 horsepower from an Audi RS5, BMW M3, Cadillac ATS-V, Lexus RC F, or Mercedes-Benz AMG C 63. These cars also feature stiffer suspension tuning that readies them for racetrack-ready handling poise.
But maybe you just want to go fast.
Enter the Infiniti Q50 Red Sport 400 compact entry-luxury sedan, or its Q60 coupe variant. It’s not necessarily red, but the “400” justifies the name “sport.” That’s the horsepower rating from the Infiniti’s turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 engine. And while its base price isn’t exactly a steal at $51,995, it offers super-quick acceleration for the price of far less zippy European competitors.

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Redesigned Camry Hybrid ups its fuel-saving game

The 2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid is priced from $28,695 and can get more than 50 miles per gallon. COURTESY PHOTOThe 2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid is priced from $28,695 and can get more than 50 miles per gallon. COURTESY PHOTO  If you drive a hybrid, odds are that you drive a Toyota. Although competition has become fierce in the gas-electric segment of the market, Toyota has the largest number of hybrid models and most of the bestselling ones.
One of those popular models is the Camry Hybrid midsize sedan, which has been available now for more than a decade. As the gas-electric version of America’s bestselling car, it combines excellent fuel economy with the Camry’s high standards for roominess and comfort.
The Camry Hybrid is now better than ever. All Camry models were fully redesigned for 2018, providing fresh styling, more luxurious interiors and improved driving dynamics. The hybrid also benefits from mechanical upgrades that greatly improve its gas mileage. The base LE model soars from an EPA rating of 40 miles per gallon to a class-leading 52 mpg, while the better-equipped SE and XLE improve from a worst-in-class 38 mpg to an excellent 46 mpg.

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Redesigned Kia subcompact puts economy first

The redesigned 2018 Kia Rio subcompact car strives to be simple, functional and affordable, and generally succeeds. COURTESY PHOTOThe redesigned 2018 Kia Rio subcompact car strives to be simple, functional and affordable, and generally succeeds. COURTESY PHOTO  If you haven’t bought an economy car in a while, it’s easy to get sticker shock. The cheapest automatic-transmission Honda Civic wears a sticker price north of $20,000, and it’s become common for a fully-loaded compact sedan to approach $30,000.
But if you’d like to follow a stricter budget, several subcompact models serve as functional transportation while providing contemporary features such as Bluetooth and USB smartphone connectivity, rearview cameras and touchscreen infotainment systems. And while they won’t match the artfully-refined driving dynamics and spacious interior of today’s Civic, these options don’t have to disappoint you for ride smoothness, driver comfort and cabin build quality.
One such option is the 2018 Kia Rio, which has been freshly redesigned and is available as a four-door sedan and a five-door hatchback. It’s priced from $14,795 and is a perfectly serviceable commuter companion.
As part of this year's redesign, Kia stripped the Rio of its earlier design flair, leaving a plainer but more functional little box on wheels — trading verve for maximum value and improved visibility. That change speaks to the car’s attitude: It handles most tasks with competence, but offers little excellence. While many recent subcompact cars have tried to come off as sporty and upscale — notably, the Ford Fiesta and the last-generation Rio — Kia stuck with basic, functional and affordable.

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Sport sedans that have room to stretch out

The 2018 Volvo S90 is a stylish and sporty luxury sedan with more rear legroom than ever. COURTESY PHOTOThe 2018 Volvo S90 is a stylish and sporty luxury sedan with more rear legroom than ever. COURTESY PHOTOIn most cases, luxury sedans are limited to two of three qualities: a sporty driving experience, a roomy interior and a (relatively) attainable price.
Powerful engines and fun-to-drive handling are common in the compact and midsize luxury classes, but these models tend to be a little tight in the back seat – or at least not stretch-out spacious. Models such as the Cadillac XTS and Lincoln Continental offer plenty of room but prioritize a smooth ride over handling poise. And while a Mercedes-Benz S-Class offers exquisite driving dynamics along with a spacious cabin, it’s generally priced into the six figures.
Two recently tested sedans, newly updated for 2018, offer a compelling balance of all three qualities. One is the Genesis G80, a big but fairly priced sedan from Hyundai’s luxury brand, which is newly available in a "Sport" trim with powerful turbocharged engine and revised suspension tuning. The other is the Volvo S90, which received a longer wheelbase to improve rear seat space just one year after it debuted for 2017.

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Midsize Hyundai offers functional value

The 2018 Hyundai Sonata is an affordable, generally pleasant midsize sedan that’s less polished and fancy than the leading competitors. COURTESY PHOTOThe 2018 Hyundai Sonata is an affordable, generally pleasant midsize sedan that’s less polished and fancy than the leading competitors. COURTESY PHOTO  Today’s car shoppers have many options for functionality and value. These qualities once defined the midsize family sedan class, but many buyers have turned instead to less expensive compact cars or to roomier crossover SUVs.
As many purely practical car shoppers look elsewhere, many midsize sedans have increasingly prioritized style and luxury to succeed in a more premium niche. But if you just want something comfortable and functional and still prefer a spacious four-door sedan, you should check out the newly-updated 2018 Hyundai Sonata.
The Sonata isn’t a dramatically-styled sports sedan like the latest Honda Accord, whose luxury-grade looks and driving experience elevate it above the family car norm. But the Sonata is also less expensive, with the well-equipped base SE model presenting a particularly strong value.
The 2018 Sonata starts at $22,935, and according to pricing site Truecar.com, you should be able to haggle it below $20,000. That’s an advantage of some $2,500 over a base Accord, and Hyundai also throws in an Android Auto/Apple CarPlay-compatible touchscreen, a blind-spot monitoring system and a long warranty.

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Cadillac and Lexus luxury sedans offer variety

The Cadillac CT6 full-size luxury sedan has sportier, more agile handling than its competitors. COURTESY PHOTO  The Cadillac CT6 full-size luxury sedan has sportier, more agile handling than its competitors. COURTESY PHOTO  For generations of Americans, their parents and grandparents bought Cadillacs that were built for cushy comfort, with softly-tuned suspensions that approximated the ride quality and handling agility of a water bed and seats that felt like living room couches.
You can still get that old-school Cadillac experience with the brand's XTS sedan and Escalade SUV models, but those who haven't been carefully watching General Motors' luxury brand will likely be astonished by the brilliantly executed sports sedans dominating the rest of the lineup: the ATS, the CTS, and Cadillac's current flagship sedan, the CT6.
The CT6 – which comes priced starting at $55,090 and can run beyond $90,000 – has a spacious interior, rides smoothly and quietly, and despite its' full-sized footprint delivers the sprightly handling of a vehicle a size smaller – a level of handling once the exclusive provenance of European luxury brands.

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Mitsubishi crossover, big Toyota sedan retain some appeal

2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport cropped for webThe 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport doesn't impress for its refinement or fuel efficiency, but it delivers a true crossover experience in a small and affordable package. COURTESY PHOTO  Mitsubishi was ahead of the curve when it launched the 2011 Outlander Sport. A size smaller than a Honda CR-V or Toyota RAV4, the Outlander Sport offered the high seating position, available all-wheel-drive and useful cargo capacity of competing compact crossovers – just without as much bulk or as high of a price.
Now, an entire market class has joined Mitsubishi: the subcompact crossover. It faces off against such competitors as the Honda HR-V and Toyota C-HR, after those automakers also realized that not everyone wanted a crossover as large as their best-selling models.
The Outlander Sport has changed little since 2011, but it retains its fundamental appeal. From its base price of $21,360, the 2018 Outlander Sport provides a credible crossover experience in a class where some models offer no more cargo space or ground clearance than an economy car. Mitsubishi also boosts its value quotient by including such items as a touchscreen infotainment system, 18-inch alloy wheels and automatic climate control as no-extra-cost standard equipment, along with generous warranty coverage.
That's not to say that it's all good news. Even back in 2011, the Outlander Sport wasn't too impressive for its refinement or driving dynamics – and without major mechanical upgrades since then, it's not surprising that the 2018 also isn't going to blow you away.

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Updated midsize sedans take different approaches

2018 Honda Accord cropped for webThe redesigned 2018 Honda Accord delivers exemplary levels of performance, luxury and everyday utility. COURTESY PHOTO  These days, the once-staid midsize family sedan market segment is quickly becoming anything but boring.
Just look at the class's two bestsellers: the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord. Both are benefiting from 2018 redesigns that have transformed their characters.
Previously, these two models were as famous for their high degrees of competence as they were for their plain characters – lacking the luxury, style and sporty performance that distinguish mainstream cars from luxury ones. Now, both blur that line, at least based on short preview drives. These sedans remain spacious and affordable, yet they now boast flashier styling, posher interiors, more solid-feeling ride quality, more responsive steering and handling, and zippier acceleration.
The 2018 Camry stood out from the crowd when it appeared over the summer, and the new Accord promises to join it when it hits the market this week. The Camry tops the Accord for brute-force horsepower, but the Accord's turbocharged four-cylinder engines are punchy and light. Both cars are rated for economy-car fuel consumption, with base models comfortably exceeding 30 mpg in mixed driving.

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VW crossover and the redesigned Camry stand out

2018 Volkswagen Atlas cropped for webThe 2018 Volkswagen Atlas is a must-see full-size crossover for shoppers who care about interior space and handling agility. COURTESY PHOTO  The best method of breaking into a new market segment: being better than the competition.
In many key ways, Volkswagen pulls off that approach with the 2018 Atlas, the German carmaker's first full-size seven-passenger crossover. Exceptional interior volume benefits both passengers and cargo, and composed ride and handling lend it a sense of mechanical sophistication.
Priced from $31,425, the Atlas faces strong competition from the best-selling Ford Explorer and Honda Pilot; the updated Nissan Pathfinder; the sporty and luxurious Mazda CX-9; the fuel-efficient Toyota Highlander; and the 2018 redesign of the extra-roomy Chevrolet Traverse.

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Chevrolet adds some style while Lexus tries to save gas

Chevrolet Malibu cropped for webThe latest Chevrolet Malibu midsize sedan is an appealing blend of style, luxury, functionality and value. COURTESY PHOTO  The last generation of the Chevrolet Malibu midsize sedan, sold from the 2013 through 2015 model years, offered an odd mix of strengths and weaknesses.
On the one hand, the old Malibu offered impressive driving dynamics – a particularly solid feel that lent composure to its ride and handling, leaving a Toyota Camry or Hyundai Sonata feeling flimsy in comparison. But this luxurious ambiance was undercut by humdrum styling inside and out, and the old Malibu also suffered from skimpy rear-seat room.
Chevrolet fully redesigned the Malibu last year to address these issues, and transformed the car into a more thoroughly impressive car. Priced from $22,555, it brings a more thoroughly premium feel to the mainstream class, while also improving on important family-car values. The current Malibu regains the mojo of the 2008 to 2012 Malibu, yet it sacrifices less outward visibility and rear headroom to make a styling statement. And although sticker prices can be high, pricing site Truecar.com projects ample room for haggling that can turn this Chevrolet into a relative bargain despite its premium feel.

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