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Dear young American little girl

Charottlesville 2Dear America,
What a beautiful name for, I am sure, a beautiful young lady. I received your letter asking me why I thought there is so much hatred and violence in our country.
It was a very thoughtful letter and I will attempt to provide you with an equally thoughtful response.
In my opinion the person most responsible for the very visible and blatant instances of hatred in America is none other than former President Barack H. Obama.
It seems to me that when this nation elected its very first African-American president there was a rather large segment of our society that just could not bring itself to have an African American in the White House as our president.
This segment of society sought a leader to lead them and their hatred out of the shadows and into the mainstream. They found that leader in none other than game show host Donald J. Trump. Mr. Trump, you may recall, was the leader of what is now known as the birther movement which questioned President Obama's birthplace and, in so doing, questioned his legitimacy to the presidency.

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Welcome to a brand new scary game

DD At Klan Rally in MarylandDaryl Davis with a member of the Ku Klux Klan. COURTESY PHOTO  The country that created and popularized such seasonal sports games as football, baseball, and basketball, has now created an all-season game, impervious to any type of weather. Its participants are obsessed with playing it seven days per week and twenty-four hours per day. It's called The Blame Game.
For the last eight years, anything and everything that was wrong in our country or in our own personal lives was blamed on President Obama. It became so ridiculous that if someone stepped of the sidewalk the wrong way and twisted their ankle, they blamed Obama.
Today, while some are still playing the old Obama version, others have moved on to the new Trump version. Ironically, the Donald himself prefers to play the old version which expired on January 20th of this year, and he does so every time he has the opportunity. In fact, it's become addictive for him.
What is sad is that the United States, once a very proactive country, leading the world has become complacent and reactive in taking steps to find solutions rather than cast aspersions. Our citizens' reaction has been to blame the country's leaders. There are those who say race relations in America are the worst they've seen and eight years of President Barack Obama is to blame. Others claim that the blame for a rise in extremist hate groups and the violent and deadly event which recently took place in Charlottesville, Va., lies squarely on the shoulders of President Donald Trump.

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The enlightenment of the Charlottesville riot

Lee Park Charlottesville VACharlottesville, Virginia is a beautiful city. I recall quite vividly taking my children there to visit Monticello, the home of President Thomas Jefferson, a true Renaissance man. It was quite an “enlightening” experience for us to say the least.
The word “enlightening” can also be used to describe the events in Charlottesville on Saturday, August 12th which resulted in an innocent protester allegedly having her life snuffed out by a white supremacist.
The history of heinous acts inflicted on this country by white supremacists can be traced back decades if not centuries and includes lynchings and goes all the way through such events as the Charleston Church massacre and now Charlottesville.
The enlightenment to which I am referring is the hopeful enlightenment of the portion of the electorate that placed Trump in the presidency. It is enlightenment to his clear leanings toward white supremacy as evidenced by so many of his policy positions including Muslim bans and Mexican wall building.

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Combating racism

  • Published in Local

DD At Klan Rally in MarylandLocal musician Daryl Davis has unique way to combat racism. COURTESY PHOTO

Daryl Davis has spent most his life trying to answer one question: “How can you hate me if you don’t even know me?”

The 58-year-old African-American author, musician and actor from Silver Spring, has spent years studying, interacting and befriending white supremacists.

Since the presidential election of Donald Trump, who he said has energized white supremacists; Davis maintains the best way for people to confront racists is to talk with them face to face.

“The way I would challenge them is to invite them to the table,” he said. “Not shout at them but invite them to the table for a roundtable discussion.”

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