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Printmaking takes on three dimensions at Harmony Hall


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Photo by Wanda Jackson. Using innovative printmaking techniques, artist Winston Harris produces two- and three-dimensional monoprints, including these three-dimensional silkscreens “3D Rolex,” All the Time III” and “3D Movado.”

Photo by Wanda Jackson. Using innovative printmaking techniques, artist Winston Harris produces two- and three-dimensional monoprints, including these three-dimensional silkscreens “3D Rolex,” All the Time III” and “3D Movado.”

Published on: Wednesday, February 13, 2013

By Wanda Jackson

In less than eight seconds — the benchmark advertisers use for judging reaction to direct-mail pieces — artist Winston Harris’s work captures and keeps its onlooker’s attention.

Harris combined traditional and non-traditional abstract printmaking techniques to produce compelling, two-dimensional and three-dimensional monoprints. He used color theory, line quality, balance, perspective, scale and other formal techniques to create his contemporary works.

Walking into his “Printmaking in 2 and 3 Dimensions” exhibit — on view through March 16 at Harmony Hall Regional Center in Fort Washington — one of the first works that grabs viewers’ attention is a mobile-structure suspended from the ceiling.

“Stallion” is a three-dimensional, mixed-media, double-sided monoprint that measures 40-by-24-by-6 inches. As it slowly spins, one horse then another of these magnificent creatures becomes visible.

Courtesy photo. “Special Thanks to SC,” a mixed media silkscreen, evolved from the artist’s chance meeting with legendary jazz guitarist Stanley Clarke.

Courtesy photo. “Special Thanks to SC,” a mixed media silkscreen, evolved from the artist’s chance meeting with legendary jazz guitarist Stanley Clarke.

The work, which is in what Harris calls his “Retrospective Series,” is an example of how he has “applied different elements to display a transition such as introducing two disciplines into one format, transforming two-dimensional prints into three-dimensional forms, combining different mediums, reinventing the image by recycling past artwork into a new identity.”

Harris’s exhibit features three additional series.

In “Time Experience,” Harris said his works reflect his “interpretation of time by using elements and images associated with the conceptual theme. The artwork identifies my interest to recognize the importance of time as an event itself, what part it plays in one’s life or how one uses it.

“The audience will be introduced to the evolution involving selected imagery that represents the mechanical parts as designs of high profile time pieces, as an attempt to provoke and promote self awareness, social consciousness and spiritual enlightenment.”

For example, “All the Time” has a double meaning, Harris said. It incorporates the logos from high profile watches —Movado, Rolex and Cartier — and, the usual “reply to ‘God is good.’”

Harris’s “Stanley Clarke Series” stems from a happenstance encounter.

“During a live performance at Blues Alley in Washington, D.C., I was able to draw legendary jazz guitarist Stanley Clarke. His manager saw the drawings and asked me if I wanted to meet him,” Harris said. When Harris presented his drawings, Clarke autographed them.

In 2007, while an artist-in-residence at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Harris, assisted by students, created four-foot screens from his 9-by-12-inch drawings of Clarke.

In his current show, Harris exhibits nine Stanley Clarke works: six 42-inch-by-six-foot silk-screened prints and three sets of smaller scale individual prints. A few of the large-scale prints are rearranged into a collage format to construct silkscreen murals.

Harris’s “Secret Garden Series” is an “extension of the ‘Time Experience Series.’” Here, however, said Harris, the imagery is “inspired by my interpretation to represent nature and ‘Secret Garden’ by Barry White,” the two-time Grammy Award-winner known for his distinctive bass voice and romantic image.

“I want viewers to feel visually and emotionally entertained,” said Harris. “I want viewers to understand the conceptual theme and the craftsmanship applied.”

“Printmaking in 2 and 3 Dimensions” is the Black History Month: Biannual Fine Art Exhibit at Harmony Hall Regional Center. For directions and exhibit information, call 301-203-6070.

Reader Comments - 1 Total

captcha 0ad34a0fd58c4ddc82c51cb37a8ce20b

Posted By: Tim smith On: 2/18/2013

Title: Harris is a good subject and building

I love what is said about Harris, great to see his commitment to his expression, and how he touch on many aspects of our living and rhymatic expressions of life!
TMS




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